Berserk Fireworks! - CBS talk 2019

Explanation
Explanation: 

CBS 2019 - Andrew will add explanation later!

In the meantime, a list of the demos in the talk:
1. Burning a methanol-salt mix to show the flame colours of different elements. Presenter to do this.
2. Rolling balls / elastic – two possible ways of showing that we need to put energy in to break things apart, and can get energy back from them coming together. “Ramp” might be a hill made out of a box and some sheets of card that with enough energy (i.e. activation energy) you can roll over. Would likely have child up to help.
3. Flash products – stage magic products that burn rapidly. Paper is sort of tossed in the air and burns out before it could ever land. Presenter would do this. Normal cotton to be burnt for comparison.
4. Sparklers – a child could hold this. Just showing that they can sparkle.
5. Candle – indoor firework to be lit by presenter.
6. Exploding Pringles can – fill a Pringles tube with a hole in the base and side with either hydrogen made from zinc+acid or methane from the gas taps depending on what we can get. The escaping gas is lit from the hole in the base of (inverted) can. Side hole draws O in until stoichiometry happens i.e. BOOM. Can shoot into air. Would be done by presebter.
5. Party poppers – to be given to audience to fire, possibly in groups.
6. Atomic energy levels – kids to pass or gently throw balls to each other to explain ions catching electrons and emitting light.

Risk Assessment
Date risk assesment last checked: 
Wed, 06/02/2019
Risk assesment checked by: 
Andrew Sellek
Date risk assesment double checked: 
Thu, 07/02/2019
Risk assesment double-checked by: 
Grace Exley
Risk Assessment: 
Demo Hazard Risk Likelihood Severity Overall Mitigation Likelihood Severity Overall
Flame Test Methanol Toxic when ingested or inhaled or in contact with skin 4 3 12 Use pipette to transfer a small amount only (5-10ml) of methanol to the petri dish to avoid spills. Dispose of pipette according to departmental instructions. Cap bottle when not in use. Perform in well-ventilated space. Burn off excess methanol rather than pouring away. Wash skin or eyes throughly if come into contact. Keep nearby eyewash that can be administered by first aider. Remove contaminated clothing - wear a lab coat to protect this. Demonstrator only to handle. Wear eye protection and gloves. Get medical assistance if necessary. 2 3 6
Methanol Extremely flammable - low flash point of 11 C (gives off enough vapour at 11 C for a spark to ignite it). Flame is often nearly colourless. 4 4 16 Remove (closed) bottle from area of experiment before lighting. Never add methanol to a burning dish or one that is still hot as may burn back into bottle. Use a borosilicate petri dish (not eg a watch glass as these can tip easily, must be borosilicate). Perform on a heat proof surface with amply spaced dishes. Keep petri dish covers at hand in order to extinguish flame. Remove flammable materials from area as well as anything that might spark. Keep hands away from petri dishes once alight unless confident the flame is out. Any out of control fires should be dealt with in the usual way with a fire blanket or extinguisher or by calling 999. Cover when burnt out to avoid ignition of leftover salts. In case of burns, call first aider. 2 4 8
NaCl No significant risks. - - - - - -
CuSO4 Harmful if swallowed, causes eye and skin irritation, toxic to aquatic life. 3 4 12 Wash off skin, rinse eyes for 15 minutes. Wear lab coat, eye protection and gloves. Dispose of according to departmental instructions. Get medical assistance if necessary e.g. ingested. Stand clear to avoid inhalation. 2 3 6
CaCl2 Serious eye irritation. 2 3 6 Wash off skin, rinse eyes for 15 minutes. Wear lab coat, eye protection and gloves. Dispose of according to departmental instructions. Get medical assistance if necessary. Stand clear to avoid inhalation. 2 2 4
BaCl2 Toxic if swallowed, harmful if inhaled. 3 4 12 As above. Avoid breathing fumes by standing clear. If swallowed rinse mouth and seek immediate medical assistance. 2 3 6
KCl No significant risk. - - - - - -
SrCl2 Causes serious eye damage. 2 4 8 As above, with emphasis on protective gear and rinsing eyes for 15 minutes. 2 3 6
Hill Demo Rolling balls Ball is rolled too hard or in an uncontrolled way and hits someone. 3 2 6 Set up ramp pointing away from audience, with something to catch the ball at the end. Use a light tennis ball. Caution volunteer to be gentle. 2 1 2
Elastic Demo Elastic bands Bands snapping, may ping into someone. 3 1 3 Avoid over stretching bands. Use fresh bands that are not worn out. 2 1 2
Flash Products Flash cotton Highly Flammable and burns rapidly, risk of burns or triggering fire. Used by stage magicians. 4 3 12 Store wet and cold and dry out before use. Use in small quantities. Perform on a heat proof surface. Light with a long-nosed lighter. In case of burn run under cold water & call first aider. In case of out of control fire, deal with in the usual way with a fire blanket or extinguisher or by calling 999 and evacuate if necessary. 3 3 9
Cotton Flammable, risk of burns. 4 2 8 Use in small quantities. Perform on a heat proof surface. Light with a long-nosed lighter. In case of burn run under cold water & call first aider. In case of out of control fire, deal with in the usual way with a fire blanket or extinguisher or by calling 999 and evacuate if necessary. 3 2 6
Flash Paper Highly Flammable, risk of minor burns to fingers. Commonly used for magic performances and theatrics. Paper may be infused with sparkle powder (akin to sparkler material) with small extra risk from hot sparks. 4 3 12 Store wet and cold and dry out shortly before use. Use in small quantities so that burns fast and don't ball up. Hold with tweezers, or with hands only if confident and experienced and able to time letting go. In case of burn, run under cold water & call first aider. 3 3 9
Sparklers Sparklers Indoor firework sold for public use, popular with children. Very hot, risk of burns. 3 2 6 Hold at arm's length. Wear glove if possible to protect from direct exposure. Drop into bucket of water to cool when finished. Don't give to children under 5. Don't wave them violently or run with them. Avoid loose clothing and hair. Supervise children when in use. 2 2 4
Ice Fountain Candle Indoor firework sold for public use, used as a candle. Very hot, risk of burns. 3 3 9 Light with long nosed lighter. Stand well clear - under no circumstances hold. Ensure it is not close to any flammable material - the jet of sparks can be quite large and can shower out. Do not try to extinguish during use and beware it will be hot after. Ensure that is is firmly secured in a suitable base. 2 2 4
Exploding Pringles Can Zinc Zinc is a reducing agent and is harmful to the environment. 1 2 2 Dispose of safely. 1 1 1
Zinc In powdered form may be an irritant to eyes. Explosive if dispersed and may produce harmful zinc oxide fumes. 3 3 9 Clean up any zinc spills, remove powder from vicinity of any flame. Wear eye protection. In case of ignition, extinguish fire if possible and remove demonstrator to well ventilated area before seeking medical advice - symptoms may take hours to develop. 2 2 4
HCl (3M) Irritant, may irritate eyes and respiratory system, 3 3 9 Wear gloves and eye protection. Avoid breathing any fumes by keeping reasonable distance from any heated sources (including those that are reacting). In case of contact rinse eyes throughly for ten minutes, rinse skin and seek medical assistance if necessary. 2 2 4
Natural gas/hydrogen Explosive. Hydrogen flame burns clear and may be hard to see. Risk of burns or hitting by "exploding" container. Not known to cause fires and explosion is well contained. 4 4 16 Use natural gas if possible as flame is more clearly visible and avoids need to use the above chemicals to generate hydrogen. Ensure that a good supply of gas is given to the tube with the hole uncovered to ensure that the air is throughly flushed to avoid an instant explosion that might injure the demonstrator and tape over after until used to avoid oxygen contamination. Light with long nosed ligher and do not approach until reaction has concluded as it could explode at any point but may take some time to do so. Can will be propelled a reasonable way into the air so make sure to stand clear. Launch from a heat proof surface. In case of burns, rinse under cold water and seek medical advice if necessary. In case of burn run under cold water & call first aider. In case of out of control fire, deal with in the usual way with a fire blanket or extinguisher or by calling 999 and evacuate if necessary. 3 3 9
Loud bang People of a nervous disposition may be startled by the bang. Possible damage to hearing. 4 2 8 Warn people of bang. Have them cover their ears if possible. Don't stand to close to experiment and wear ear protection if necessary. 3 2 6
Party Poppers Party Poppers Minor explosives, but licensed for personal, indoor use. Risk of injury from explosive charge or the ejecta. To be used by audience members. 3 3 9 Point away from other people when pulling. Do not attempt to disassemble or isolate charge - audience should be advised of this. Do not give to small children, preferably hand out to parents to look after until requisite point and have them supervise use. 2 2 4
Party Poppers Loud, risk of damage to ears. 4 3 12 Do not use near ears and instruct this before anyone uses. To lower the number being fired at once, hand out one per child only, and possibly do it in groups. 2 2 4
Spent poppers Will leave debris around, could present trip/slip hazard. 5 2 10 Ask everyone to take their rubbish away - station someone on exit to collect up. Ensure rubbish is cleared before next talk begins. 2 2 4
Atomic Energy Levels and Electrons Steps Moving between steps of lecture theatre to represent energy levels of atom with risk of tripping/stumbling. 3 2 6 Exercise caution. Move sensibly without leaping across several steps. In case of injury seek first aid. 2 1 2
Plastic balls Thrown or passed between people . May hit someone if thrown. May present trip hazard if dropped. 3 2 6 Encourage volunteers not to throw balls unless deemed old enough to do so accurately and then only when directed. Ensure any balls that are thrown are not thrown towards audience but to expecting recipient. If balls are dropped, demonstrator to retrieve immediately, ask volunteer not to run after it. 2 1 2
General Liquids Slip hazard 4 3 12 Clear up spills as soon as possible if on a slippery floor, taking due care to nature of what has been spilt. Do experiments in tray where possible to avoid spilled liquid going on floor. Put wet floor sign down if needed. Call first aider in case of injury. 2 3 6
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